A film about Northwest hip-hop from

NEWCOMER

This 82-minute feature film is an intimate introduction to Seattle’s vibrant hip-hop underground. It was assembled from hundreds of tiny performance clips—shot for Instagram—into a single, continuous concert mosaic, and stars 93 of the top hip-hop artists from The Town.

Here’s how KEXP describes it in their review: “NEWCOMER stretches the idea of the concert film to an artistic extreme: Sub-minute snippets artfully arranged to resemble a field recording of Seattle’s rap scene, the pieces fractured and pieced back together in a truly engrossing way. The narrative flows through venues like Barboza, Cha Cha Lounge, Vermillion, Lo-Fi, the Showbox, the Crocodile, and dozens more. It’s Khris P pouring Rainier into a Solo cup while he raps; bodies packed into regional landmark ETC Tacoma; SassyBlack improvising a song urging concertgoers to buy her merch; the delightfully awkward dance moves of white people in KEXP’s Gathering Space; Chong the Nomad beatboxing and playing harmonica simultaneously; Bruce Leroy bullying a beat next to the clothing racks at All-Star Vintage; Specswizard rhyming about his first time performing in front of a crowd while standing before The Dark Crystal playing on a projection screen. The film is about the moments we experience—as lovers of live performance—just as much as the performances themselves.”

NEWCOMER was directed by Gary Campbell and was an official selection at the 2020 New York Hip-Hop Film Festival and the 2020 Golden Sneakers International Hip-Hop Film Festival in Hamburg, Germany. Throughout November 2020, the film screened for four weeks on the Northwest Film Forum theatrical screening site in honor of Hip-Hop History Month.

You can watch the full movie below.

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A film about Northwest hip-hop from

Keep the Peace

Hmmm... There's not a lot of information about this project in the museum encyclopedia. We'd love your help! TOWN LOVE is maintained by an awesome community of passionate volunteers who keep it all up to date.

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A film about Northwest hip-hop from

Channel Surfing

The Seattle Times describes this solo debut from Tacoma painter and rapper Perry Porter as “manic, with voice-cracking bars over thickets of trunk-knocking bass… short bursts that, like a good punk record, leave you craving more.” The Blow Up points to Porter’s “high energy chaos and smooth funk.” CityArts says “He bounces from syrupy drawl to chirpy double-time to suit each song’s character, street-hardened but self-deprecating, stoned, surreal, and cartoonish.” Distinction describes it as “an alt-trapper bouncer made of SoundCloud-era strangeness.”

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A film about Northwest hip-hop from

Tales From The T, Volume 1

Hmmm... There's not a lot of information about this project in the museum encyclopedia. We'd love your help! TOWN LOVE is maintained by an awesome community of passionate volunteers who keep it all up to date.

Do you know something about the history of this record? Do you have a favorite lyric or a favorite memory? Send us an email on why this is one of the great hip-hop albums from the Northwest. Thanks!

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A film about Northwest hip-hop from

Apply The Pressure

WebbWavvy wasn’t much on my radar before September, when he was featured on the cover of Northwest Leaf magazine—alongside Kung Foo Grip, Gifted Gab and Yodi Mac—as one of Seattle’s “most stoned” emcees. It’s an auspicious way to make a debut, and I suspect for him it’s all magazine covers going forward. In October, that magazine, along with Respect My Region, mounted a hip-hop showcase featuring these four cover stars. (In my humble opinion, it was arguably the best hip-hop show of 2017.) WebbWavvy was first to the stage and he blew the roof right off. Next time you need to get the party started, hiring this talent should be your first task. Apply The Pressure is his too-short four-track EP. It’s a shot of adrenaline, a gritty trap blast straight to the heart. I’ve been playing this on repeat while waiting for a longer project from Mr. Webb. In my notes, I wrote, “love that FML song.” Later, when I went back to look up the title, I realized that “FML” is spoken and yelled and repeated throughout all four of these songs. It doesn’t matter: They’re all great tracks, containing a fresh and killer party vibe that’ll make you want to drink and smoke and jump around like a madman. Crank this in a car with a subwoofer and you’ll be hard-pressed to keep yourself to the speed limit. And seek out the trippy A.K. Romero-directed twofer video for “Detonate x Scholarship,” online now.

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